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December 2015

The Difference You Made In 2015…

Thank you for your generosity and support in 2015. This year, your contributions made a difference in the lives of more than 200 job seekers and their families who came to Daily Work this year. Thanks to your support, our job seekers were helped with the following services at Daily Work: Found new jobs that averaged nearly 30 hours per week and $11.00 an hour. Started and/or completed training programs in a variety of fields Learned about resources that helped them get better food, clothing, and shelter Received grant assistance for transportation, education, clothing, energy assistance, and more Because of you, …
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December Newsletter

“New Home. New Job. New Future.” Recovering from a long period of joblessness is hard. Statistics show that a long period of unemployment can be as a harmful to a job search as having a felony in your past. Your support of Daily Work helps our job seekers get the resources and skills they need to advance in their careers.     Every gift makes a difference to Daily Work job seekers. Kona had not held a job since 2012 when she first came to Daily Work in June 2014. After struggling with complications with diabetes, losing her job, and then …
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Working with Immigrants at Daily Work

Working with Immigrants at Daily Work My family came to the United States in 2004. I remember that I did not know how to speak, to read, and to write in English. It was very hard for me and it took a long time to learn English well, but I knew that if I wanted to go to college, become an educated person, and get a good job that I would have to do everything I could do to learn English well. As an intern case manager at Daily Work, I work with many clients who, like me, are immigrants …
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Do You Have Implicit Bias?

Do You Have Implicit Bias? I am a senior in college studying social work. Through my studies, I have become more aware of my own implicit biases. Implicit biases refer to the stereotypes that affect our understandings, actions, and decisions, usually without us realizing it. I learned about my own biases by taking the “Implicit Association Test,” a test Harvard University created to measure the biases that people might be unwilling or unable to report. Two years ago I would have said that I was “color blind” and that most people are like me. I believed I could understand the …
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